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Thinning Practices in Southern Pines - With Pest Management Recommendations

T. Evan Nebeker – Respectively, professor, Department of Entomology,
John D. Hodges – Professor, Department of Forestry, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS,
Bob K. Karr – Assistant professor, Department of Forestry, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, and
David M. Moehring – Professor (deceased), Department of Forestry, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS.

United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Technical Bulletin 1703, December 1985.

Contents

Acknowledgments
 
Introduction
 
Growth of Trees and Stands
  Height and Diameter Growth
  Stand Development
  Stocking
 
Thinning Practices in the Southern Pines
  Initial Spacing and the Need for Thinnings
  Timing of the First Thinning
  Intensity
  Frequency
  Methods
  Thinning Systems
 
Beneficial Effects of Thinning
  Increased Growth
  Increased Utilization
  Reduced Susceptibility to Diseases and Insects
  Genetic Improvement
  Other Benefits
 
Adverse Effects of Thinning
  Felling-Related Damage to Residual Trees
  Skidding-Related Damage to Site and Residual Stems
  Indirect Thinning Damage
 
Impacts of Thinning on Nontimber Values
 
Discussion
  Growth Factors
  Damage Factors
 
Management Recommendations to Reduce Losses
  Minimizing Damaging Agents
  Minimizing Felling Injuries
  Minimizing Skidding Injuries
 
Summary
 
Literature Cited

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Last updated on Wednesday, July 03, 2002 at 02:31 PM
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